Fall 2007

Canon Magazine Fall 2007

Contributors:

Suzanne Farrell, Editor,
Liberal Studies

Suzanne Farrell

Suzanne Farrell is a second year Liberal Studies student and an editor of canon. She and editor Justin Wolf converted the magazine from a print publication to its current online format. Suzanne’s master’s thesis is a memory quest informed by psychology, neuroscience, literature, and memoirs. After graduating from the NSSR, Suzanne plans to attend the MFA Program in Creative Writing at Vermont College of Fine Arts. She founded and hosts a salon for writers in the NYC area.
I-Yi Hsieh, Anthropology

I-Yi Hsieh, Anthropology

I-Yi Hsieh is finishing her first year in the MA program of Anthropology. While she should be concentrating on papers, she often ends up sketching people’s faces in the streets. Other times she goes to dances and performances, enjoys the circus and parodies happening in everyday life.
Angela Jones, Sociology

Angela Jones, Sociology

Angela Jones is a Ph.D student in the Sociology Department of the New School for Social Research. She is currently an adjunct lecturer of Sociology within the City University of New York, teaching undergraduate courses at both Baruch and York Colleges. Angela is also working on her dissertation, entitled “The Niagara Movement 1905-1910: Intellectual Networks, Social Change, & the Making of Black Publics.” Her research interests are expansive. While her dissertation speaks to the existing sociological literature on social change, intellectuals, African American historiography, and publics, she also conducts research in gender and queer studies. When Angela is not teaching, writing her dissertation, conducting ethnography, or reading, she also enjoys watching the game and drinking a Miller Lite.
K. Jody Rucks, Liberal Studies

K. Jody Rucks, Liberal Studies

K. Jody Rucks, a first year Liberal Studies student, is an avant-garde auteur and poet. His artistic work is a fusion of his interests in philosophy and social change. He has written, directed, and produced several short films, and has written three feature length screenplays, in addition to over 40 poems and short stories.
Harley Spiller, Liberal Studies

Harley Spiller, Liberal Studies

Harley Spiller, who’s gunning for an MA in Liberal Studies, loves writing about himself in the third person. This summer he’s doing an independent study focused on the random notes and messages he’s peeled off the lampposts and surfaces of NYC for the past 20 years. Some images of this “scrawl” can be found in his first story from the Dec 07 issue of canon. Email Harley at ic@inspectorcollector.com
Mihnea Tanasescu, Philosophy

Mihnea Tanasescu, Philosophy

Mihnea is completing his second year as an MA student in Philosophy. His academic interests lie in the field of philosophy, while his overarching passion lies in transgressing that field with every occasion. He believes that philosophy is not done justice when it remains within its confined discourse. Rather, philosophizing itself is the drive to call established dogma into question in such a way as to allow thinking to develop in new forms. In this light, stories become important as a truly philosophical inquiry that can incorporate and make recourse to our shared aesthetic feeling.
Rebecka Thor, Liberal Studies

Rebecka Thor, Liberal Studies

My interest in the humanities derives from a perspective on art, literature, and theory as a possible basis for social critique. In the critical thought within these areas there is room for activism and a questioning of political and cultural values, such as how a canon is formed and maintained and how creative pieces or new theoretical readings can be used to reveal and question it. My main theoretical focus is on postcolonial and feminist theory, and I think that analyses of literature, art, and philosophy are of greatest interest when they can be related to a political reality. I am a also on the editorial board and a contributing writer to the Swedish cultural magazine Slut (“The End” or “Slut”).
Justin Wolf, Editor, Liberal Studies
Justin Wolf
Justin is currently writing his thesis about his experiences teaching in the Boston juvenile justice system, which he plans to turn into a full memoir and publish in the coming years. His supremely talented wife (also a writer) informs him that he’s “too loyal to everything that happened.” He concurs, yet still finds it difficult to choose what stays and what goes. After all, working in a juvenile “prison” yields many worthwhile stories.

Justin would like to thank his canon co-editor Suzanne Farrell for all her encouragement and creativity.